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Tuesday, October 20, 2020 | History

6 edition of The populist response to industrial America found in the catalog.

The populist response to industrial America

Norman Pollack

The populist response to industrial America

midwestern populist thought.

by Norman Pollack

  • 364 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass .
Written in English


ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21603076M
ISBN 100674690516

  Why Populism in America is a Double-Edged Sword. The populist tradition is nearly as old as the republic itself, but it was a farmers’ revolt in the late 19th century that broadened its. The Populist Response to Industrial America: Midwestern Populist Thought. p. Cambridge: Harvard U P, Cambridge: Harvard U P, Populists were social levelers seeking to reverse the widening gap between haves and have-nots that emerged in the late nineteenth century.

Life in Industrial America 18; American Empire 19; The Progressive Era 20; World War I & Its Aftermath 21; The New Era 22; The Great Depression 23; World War II 24; The Cold War 25; The Affluent Society 26; The Sixties 27; The Unraveling 28; The Triumph of the Right 29; The Recent Past "Norman Pollock wrote a book in the 's called *The Populist Response to Industrial America* documenting quite persuasively that the Populist Party of the 's, though composed mostly of farmers, was quite sympathetic to urban labor, which it saw as being oppressed by the same forces that exploited the farmers. The Populists wanted an.

The Gilded Age and the first years of the twentieth century were a time of great social change and economic growth in the United States. Roughly spanning the years between Reconstruction and the dawn of the new century, the Gilded Age saw rapid industrialization, urbanization, the construction of great transcontinental railroads, innovations in science and technology, and the rise of big business. The Populist Response to Industrial America represents a spirited effort to do just that, but Pollack's quest for ideological coherence led him to some questionable conclusions. One might be surprised to learn that Populism addressed such sophisticated concepts as technological unemployment, alienation, surplus value, and underconsumption, thus.


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The populist response to industrial America by Norman Pollack Download PDF EPUB FB2

In The Populist Response to Industrial America, Norman Pollack argues that Midwestern Populists were radical reformers who responded to industrialization in a progressive manner.

Pollack's study is a revisionist response to previous Populist histories that portrayed the movement as regressive and opposed to by: The Populist Response to Industrial America Midwestern Populist Thought. Populism—progressive or retrogressive force. Posing this question, Norman Pollack draws on Populist manuscripts and newspapers, the best evidence for the movement’s response to industrialism.

In the words of farmers and workers, Populism springs to life, ceasing to. The Populist Response to Industrial America. By Norman Pollack. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, Pp. $ This volume, first written as a doctoral dissertation, is described as offering an entirely new interpretation of the Populist movement; its author purports to present an economic instead of a political analysis.

The Populist Response to Industrial America: Midwestern Populist Thought. Populism--progressive or retrogressive force. Posing this question, Norman Pollack draws on Populist manuscripts and newspapers, the best evidence for the movement's response to industrialism.4/5(1).

In The Populist Response to Industrial America, Norman Pollack argues that Midwestern Populists were radical reformers who responded to industrialization in a progressive manner.

Pollack's study is a revisionist response to previous Populist histories that portrayed the movement as regressive and opposed to industrialization/5. The Populist Response to Industrial America (Paperback) Midwestern Populist Thought. By Norman Pollack. Harvard University Press,pp.

Publication Date: Decem Book Reviews and Book Notes Book Reviews: The Populist Response to Industrial America. By Norman Pollack Article Sidebar. PDF Main Article Content. John L. Shover. San Francisco State College Article Details.

Issue Pennsylvania History vol. 31, no. 3, July Author: John L. Shover. The populist response to industrial America: midwestern populist thought by Pollack, NormanPages: The Populist response to industrial America; midwestern Populist thought.

[Norman Pollack] -- This volume argues that Midwestern Populists were radical reformers who responded to industrialization in a progressive manner.

All about The Populist Response to Industrial America by Norman Pollack. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers Home Groups Talk Zeitgeist/5.

The Populist response to industrial America: midwestern Populist thought. JK P6 Myth and reality in the Populist revolt / [by] Edwin C. Rozwenc [and] John C. Matlon. In The Populist Temptation: Economic Grievance and Political Reaction in the Modern Era, Barry Eichengreen places the surge of new populisms within deep historical context, looking at the convulsions caused by populist agitators and the response from the political Senra Rodeiro recommends this clear and highly informative analysis.

Let’s talk about the next one on your list which is Michael Kazin’s book, The Populist Persuasion: An American History ().

This book is the classic study of US populism. It was published well before populism got a lot of attention g: industrial America.

ume, The Populist Response to Industrial America: Midwestern Populist Thought (), found Populists to be rational, forward-looking, and even proto- socialist. In Kansas, Walter Nugent countered Hofstadter’s charges that Pop-ulists were nativistic bigots with The Tolerant Populists: Kansas, Populism and Nativisim ().

Scholars disagree on the reasons the Populist and industrial labor movements failed to achieve a political coalition. Some attribute the cause to a backward-looking Populist ideology that searched Author: Bruce Carruthers. Lawrence Goodwyn's history of America's Populist Movement in the late nineteenth century is an important contribution to our knowledge of social movements and American political theory.

However, Goodwyn's storytelling fails to live up to contemporary standards of political history from favorites like Doris Kearns Goodwin and Robert A. Caro, or /5. That movement, called populism, shaped the young state's politics for close to three decades. In Minnesota and throughout the U.S.

in this era, populists took on issues of economic inequality. Corporate monopolies, federal currency, and government corruption drew special concern.

“The problem with call-in shows is quite simple, if you only dare to admit it: Democracy is best when not everyone can be heard all the time. If we are constantly reminded of all the stupid things that people say and think, it becomes rather difficult to remember the good and noble arguments for everyone to be able to participate and decide.”.

The Farmers’ Alliance, a conglomeration of three regional alliances formed in the mids, took root in the wake of the Grange movement. InDr. Charles Macune, who led the Southern Alliance, which was based in Texas and had overmembers byurged the creation of a national alliance between his organization, the Northwest.

Although The Populist Explosion is a relatively short work, Judis offers a useful summary of the history of American Populism, tracing it from its roots in the People’s Party of the s. His books included, The Populist Mind (), The Populist Response to Industrial America (), The Just Polity: Populism, Law, and Human Welfare (), and The Humane Economy: Populism, Capitalism, and Democracy (), Capitalism, Hegemony and Violence in the Age of Drones ().The People's (Populist) Party emerged most directly in response to which of the following late-nineteenth-century trends?

A The efforts of businesses to gain control over markets and resources abroad B The influx of migrants from Asia and southern and eastern Europe C The growth of corporate power in agriculture and the economy D.United States - United States - The Populists: The collapse of the boom and the falling prices of agricultural products forced many farmers to seek relief through political action.

In and again in this discontent was expressed through local political groups, commonly known as Farmers’ Alliances, which quickly spread through parts of the West and in the South, where economic.